Projects from Around the Country

Green Church Kernow Awards

Gwinear Church Yard Gwinear Churchyard

Green Church Kernow

 

The Diocese of Truro, in partnership with the Methodist Church in Cornwall, has established the Green Church Kernow Awards. As part of our combined efforts to implement the recommendations of The Anglican and Methodist Environment Group we have invited our churches and those of all denominations in Cornwall to work towards achieving status as a Green Church Kernow through the Bronze, Silver and Gold awards. The Awards are intended to offer support, guidance and encouragement to churches in order for them to make changes that can reduce the impact of our activities and buildings upon the environment, something that is a very important aspect of our mission. Gwinear Church was one of the earliest recipients of an award.

http://www.trurodiocese.org.uk/about-us/green-church-kernow/

Link to video about the awards and Gwinear Church: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=atbMiRJp62w

 

Northamptonshire Churchyard Conservation Award Scheme

Stoke Doyle Field Scabious 002 sml

  The scheme was originally launched in 1983 as a competition where the winner of the best churchyard won a trophy.  It was relaunched in 2013 as an award scheme with bronze, silver and gold awards available.  This allows newcomers to enter the scheme and focuses on getting more churches involved at different levels.  We currently have 24 churches entered in the scheme, are in regular contact with over 70 churchyards and cemeteries within the county and our Patron is the Bishop of Peterborough, the Rt. Revd. Donald Allister.

St Rumbald's Churchyard in Stoke Doyle

   

An annual forum is run in the autumn where churches are presented with their awards for their continued wildlife management.  The forum is an ideal opportunity for those involved to exchange ideas and experiences.

Advisory visits are available, suggestions for management and a report are then prepared and sent to the churchyard.  They can then consider the suggestions and decide whether they would like to enter the scheme or not.

For more information visit www.wildlifebcn.org/churchyards

 

Kent God's Acre Project

The Kent project provides advice, training, tools and support for churches to encourage wildlife diversity in their churchyards. It is headed up by the Dioceses of Canterbury and Rochester, but operates with the help of other partner organisations across the county which include:
Kent Bat Group
Kent Mammal Group
Kent Reptile and Amphibian Group
The Conservation Volunteers (TCV)
Kent Heritage Trees Project, and
The British Lichen Society.

Find out more here http://www.canterburydiocese.org/candpframework/kentgodsacre
 
Contact Caroline Pinchbeck 01227 459401, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , for more information 

 

The Diocese of St Albans' Living Churchyard Project 

011 web    

The Diocese of St Albans, which covers Hertfordshire and Bedfordshire has been running the project since 2006 with support from the Herts. and Middlesex Wildlife Trust and the Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire and Northamptonshire Wildlife Trust. Many churches in the diocese now have areas of their churchyards managed in a way that allows wild flowers to flourish. Some have compost heaps, log piles or bird boxes.

An open evening at a participating churchyard is arranged each summer which allows people to exchange advice and experience. 

See www.stalbans.anglican.org/faith/living-churchyards for more information including management advice leaflets and photos of churchyards.

 Living Churchyards in Surrey

Godalming Churchyards 024 sml   

Surrey Wildlife Trust (SWT) is working with Local authorities, churches and community groups to improve the management of Surrey's churchyards and cemeteries for the benefit of people and wildlife.  Many churchyards were built in old meadow land and remnants of these old meadows still remain in the rare plants found there such as Meadow saxifrage. Allowing these plants to flower and set seed will improve Surrey's biodiversity.


SWT has formed a Living Churchyard network for groups and organisations involved in churchyard management to swap ideas and expertise.  Churchyard groups can join SWT for a small annual fee and in return will get a whole host of benefits including, support, management advice and a free talk. "The Wild Bunch" a community group from St Mary's  church Byfleet are one of the first church memberships and with SWT's help they have created a wildflower meadow and a contemplative garden out of a neglected corner of the churchyard.

For more information contact Frances Halstead Community Engagement Co-ordinator Surrey Wildlife Trust
Email  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.   or phone 07891 514574

 

Wiltshire Living Churchyard Project

The Wiltshire Living Churchyards project has 45 participating Churchyards or areas of sacred land. We are helped and supported by the Wiltshire Wildlife Trust, Wiltshire Churches Together and Social Responsibility in Wiltshire.

Wiltshire is known as the County of Chalk and Cheese with sparse downland habitat to the south and richer pastureland in the north, which provides an amazing range of floral diversity in the Churchyard projects. Some of our Churchyards have been managed in a wildlife friendly way by country folk for many years.

At our annual Seminar, we award certificates for continued wildlife management. These are approved and supported by the Bishops of Bristol and Salisbury. A couple of churchyard awards have continued management approaching 50 years.

If you would like to find out any more about us contact Ivan Randall 01666 837783

 

Yorkshire’s Living Churchyard Project

The Project, a joint venture between Yorkshire Wildlife Trust and the Yorkshire Dioceses of the Church of England, dates from 1988. The project relies on a group of very competent volunteers to help with advisory visits to churchyards. Following on from a visit to meet those interested in their churchyard, suggestions for management, a list of the species seen or heard on the visit and an annotated map of the churchyard is sent to the parish. It is then up to them to implement or modify the suggestions. Each year, Churchyard Management Seminars are held together with a number of ‘Open Churchyards’.

A collection of leaflets on aspects of churchyard conservation management was brought together in one booklet ‘Churchyard Management’. This is available by post. 

For more information visit Yorkshire Wildlife Trust’s website

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